center for victim research repository

Identity Theft: The Aftermath 2008

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dc.contributor.author Foley, Linda
dc.contributor.author Barney, Karen
dc.contributor.author Gordon, Sheila
dc.contributor.author Foley, Jay
dc.contributor.author Lee, James
dc.contributor.author Fergerson, Julie
dc.date.accessioned 2018-08-31T20:36:51Z
dc.date.available 2018-08-31T20:36:51Z
dc.date.issued 2009
dc.identifier.citation Foley, Linda; Barney, Karen; Gordon, Sheila; Foley, Jay; Lee, James; Fergerson, Julie. (2009). Identity Theft: The Aftermath 2008. Identity Theft Resource Center, 43 pgs. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.idtheftcenter.org/images/surveys_studies/Aftermath2008.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/926
dc.description Report en_US
dc.description.abstract ITRC firmly believes that only a collaborative effort that includes identity theft victims, subject matter experts, business, law enforcement and government will provide us with the tools needed to battle identity thieves. Unless we adopt a policy of "it is us" against the criminals, the criminals will continue to win. While providing a forum for victims to express their experience, ITRC’s hope is that Identity Theft: The Aftermath, will help in this collaborative effort. Victim of identity theft provide a unique insight into the crime that may not apparent to other parties. The survey respondents help to explain the gaps they encountered in victim’s rights, interactions with various entities, and identity and clarify the needs of victims of identity theft crimes. These are things we can address as a nation and as a collaboration fighting against identity theft. Through this report, readers will become aware of how lives can be interrupted, torn apart, and the emotional and financial impact of being a victim of identity theft, both short term and long term. This study reflects only the experiences of confirmed identity theft victims who worked with the ITRC in 2008. It is not a national census study of all victims of identity theft. Responses were given at the time victims responded to the survey and may not fully represent the entire experience of the individual. Thus, certain measures of victimization represent conservative estimates since the assessment was limited to the ending date of the study. (Identity Theft Resource Center Text) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Identity Theft Resource Center en_US
dc.subject Survey Results en_US
dc.subject Prevalence en_US
dc.subject Identity Theft en_US
dc.subject Economic Crimes en_US
dc.subject Financial Crime en_US
dc.subject Falsified Documents en_US
dc.subject Tax Fraud en_US
dc.subject Fraud en_US
dc.subject Medical Fraud en_US
dc.subject Costs of Crime en_US
dc.subject Financial Consequences en_US
dc.subject Economic Burden en_US
dc.subject Impact en_US
dc.subject Harms en_US
dc.subject Long Term Effects en_US
dc.subject Victim to Offender Relationship en_US
dc.subject Emotional Burden en_US
dc.subject Emotional Distress en_US
dc.subject Psychological Consequences en_US
dc.subject Consumer Crimes en_US
dc.subject Behavior en_US
dc.subject High-risk Behavior en_US
dc.subject Older Adults en_US
dc.subject Older Persons en_US
dc.subject Seniors en_US
dc.subject Adults en_US
dc.subject Child Identity Theft en_US
dc.subject Cost of Victimization en_US
dc.title Identity Theft: The Aftermath 2008 en_US
dc.type Other en_US


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