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‘Walk softly and listen carefully’: Building research relationships with tribal communities

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dc.contributor.author Christopher, Suzanne
dc.contributor.author Villegas, Malia
dc.contributor.author Daulton, Christina
dc.date.accessioned 2018-06-21T20:47:54Z
dc.date.available 2018-06-21T20:47:54Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.citation Christopher, Suzanne; Villegas, Malia; Daulton, Christina. (2012). ‘Walk softly and listen carefully’: Building research relationships with tribal communities. NCAI Policy Research Center and MSU Center for Native Health Partnerships, 35 pgs. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.ncai.org/attachments/PolicyPaper_SpMCHTcjxRRjMEjDnPmesENPzjHTwhOlOWxlWOIWdSrykJuQggG_NCAI-WalkSoftly.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/840
dc.description Report en_US
dc.description.abstract Increasingly, tribal leaders acknowledge that research is a key tool of tribal sovereignty in providing data and information to guide community planning, cross-community coordination, and program and policy development. Efforts to address longstanding issues, such as health disparities for American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN), have increasingly used partnership research approaches. This document seeks to strengthen these partnerships by providing insight about how culture, sovereignty, and experience matter in research with Native communities....Tribes have used research as a tool of sovereignty to address issues like water quality, early childhood education, cancer, diabetes, and elder care. Yet tribal leaders also continue to express concern about the need to protect cultural information and their communities from dangerous and unethical research practices. There have been historic and present-day ethical violations in the use of data and knowledge collected from AI/AN peoples (e.g., taking and misusing of blood specimens, religious items, traditional practices) and a lack of benefit returned to AI/AN communities who have participated in research....Our goal is for this resource to be a part of a learning process for researchers committed to working with AI/ AN communities as they develop understandings about the cultural, political, and lived realities of Native peoples that must be considered in research. (Author Text) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) en_US
dc.subject Policy en_US
dc.subject Guidelines en_US
dc.subject Training for Researchers en_US
dc.subject Native American en_US
dc.subject American Indian en_US
dc.subject Alaska Native en_US
dc.subject Indigenous Populations en_US
dc.subject Tribal Lands en_US
dc.subject Indian Reservations en_US
dc.subject Indian Country en_US
dc.subject Community Perceptions en_US
dc.subject Research Ethics en_US
dc.subject Victim Protection en_US
dc.subject Collaboration en_US
dc.subject Partnerships en_US
dc.subject Cultural Humility en_US
dc.subject Indigenous Knowledge en_US
dc.subject Community Perceptions en_US
dc.title ‘Walk softly and listen carefully’: Building research relationships with tribal communities en_US
dc.type Other en_US


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