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Evidence on the Long Term Effects of Home Visiting Programs: Laying the Groundwork for Long-Term Follow-Up in the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation (MIHOPE).

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dc.contributor.author Michalopoulos, Charles
dc.contributor.author Faucetta, Kristen
dc.contributor.author Warren, Anne
dc.contributor.author Mitchell, Robert
dc.date.accessioned 2018-02-20T01:02:50Z
dc.date.available 2018-02-20T01:02:50Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Michalopoulos, Charles ; Faucetta, Kristen ; Warren, Anne ; Mitchell. Robert. (2017). Evidence on the Long Term Effects of Home Visiting Programs: Laying the Groundwork for Long-Term Follow-Up in the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation (MIHOPE). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. OPRE Report 2017-73. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.mdrc.org/publication/evidence-long-term-effects-home-visiting-programs/file-full
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/720
dc.description.abstract Children from low-income families are more likely than those from higher income families to have poor social, emotional, cognitive, behavioral, and health outcomes. One approach that has helped parents and their young children is home visiting, which provides information, resources, and support to expectant parents and families with young children. This brief summarizes evidence from existing studies on the impact of early childhood home visiting on children 5 and older for four national models of home visiting. Key findings include the following: (1) Evidence-based home visiting has improved outcomes for parents and children across a wide range of child ages, outcome areas, and national models. (2) Evidence-based home visiting appears to be cost-effective in the long term. (3) The largest benefits from evidence-based home visiting come through reduced spending on government programs and increased individual earnings. (4) Home visiting has reduced the prevalence of child maltreatment. (5) Among adolescents, the studies have found statistically significant reductions in involvement with the criminal justice system, reductions in substance use among young adolescents and reductions in mortality by age 20. (Author and NCAC Text) en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries OPRE Report 2017-73;
dc.subject Child Abuse en_US
dc.subject Adolescents en_US
dc.subject Risk Factors en_US
dc.subject Prevention Programs en_US
dc.subject Intervention en_US
dc.subject Effectiveness en_US
dc.subject Evidence-based Practices en_US
dc.subject Literature Review en_US
dc.title Evidence on the Long Term Effects of Home Visiting Programs: Laying the Groundwork for Long-Term Follow-Up in the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation (MIHOPE). en_US
dc.type Technical Report en_US


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