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Cause of Death and the Quest for Meaning After the Loss of a Child (Author Manuscript)

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dc.contributor.author Lichtenthal, Wendy
dc.contributor.author Neimeyer, Robert
dc.contributor.author Currier, Joseph
dc.contributor.author Roberts, Kailey
dc.contributor.author Jordan, Nancy
dc.date.accessioned 2018-02-08T22:14:15Z
dc.date.available 2018-02-08T22:14:15Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.citation Lichtenthal, Wendy; Neimeyer, Robert; Currier, Joseph; Roberts, Kailey; Jordan, Nancy. (2013). Cause of Death and the Quest for Meaning After the Loss of a Child. Death Studies: 37 (4), 311-342. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3929231/
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/673
dc.description.abstract This study examined patterns of making meaning among 155 parents whose children died from a variety of violent and non-violent causes. Findings indicated 53% of violent loss survivors could not make sense of their loss, as compared to 32% of non-violent loss survivors. Overall, there was overlap in sense-making strategies across different causes of death, with many parents invoking spiritual and religious meanings and the cultivation of empathy for the suffering of others. Nonetheless, violent loss survivors described the imperfection of the world and brevity of life more frequently in their narrative responses than parents who lost a child to natural causes, who in turn were more likely to find benefit in the loss in terms of personal growth. Violent loss survivors—and especially those losing a child to homicide—also reported enhanced appreciation of life more frequently than survivors of non-violent losses, and surviving a child’s suicide was specifically associated with a change in priorities in the sample. Findings are discussed in terms of common and distinctive themes in meaning making that clinicians may encounter when working with parental bereavement, and the implications these carry for finding spiritual and secular significance in a traumatic loss. [CVRL Note: tool used is Inventory of Complicated Grief.] (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher National Institutes of Health (NIH) en_US
dc.subject Survey Results en_US
dc.subject Harms en_US
dc.subject Consequences en_US
dc.subject Coping en_US
dc.subject Data Analysis en_US
dc.subject Homicide Survivors en_US
dc.subject Co-Victim en_US
dc.subject Secondary Victimization en_US
dc.subject Secondary Traumatic Stress en_US
dc.subject Grief en_US
dc.subject Resilience en_US
dc.subject Long Term Effects en_US
dc.subject Violent Victimization en_US
dc.subject Violent Crime en_US
dc.title Cause of Death and the Quest for Meaning After the Loss of a Child (Author Manuscript) en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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