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Victimizations Not Reported to the Police

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dc.contributor.author Langton, Lynn
dc.contributor.author Berzofsky, Marcus
dc.contributor.author Krebs, Christopher
dc.contributor.author Smiley-Mcdonald, Hope
dc.date.accessioned 2018-01-19T15:22:42Z
dc.date.available 2018-01-19T15:22:42Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.citation Langton, Lynn; Berzofsky, Marcus; Krebs, Christopher; Smiley-McDonald, Hope. (2012). Victimizations Not Reported to the Police. National Crime Victimization Survey, Bureau of Justice Statistics: NCJ 238536, 18 pgs. en_US
dc.identifier.govdoc NCJ 238536
dc.identifier.uri https://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/vnrp0610.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/637
dc.description Report en_US
dc.description.abstract More than half of the nation’s violent crimes, or nearly 3.4 million violent victimizations per year, went unreported to the police between 2006 and 2010, according to a new report published by the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS). Using data from BJS’s National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS), this new report examines characteristics of unreported victimizations, the reasons victims did not report crimes and trends from 1994 to 2010 in the types of crime not reported to police. The percentage of violent and property crimes that went unreported to police declined from 1994 to 2010. Across the 17-year period, victims most commonly did not report violent victimizations to the police because they dealt with the crime in another way, such as reporting it to another official or handling it privately. Among unreported violent victimizations, the percentage of victims who believed the police would not or could not help doubled, from 10 percent in 1994 to 20 percent in 2010….Crimes perpetrated by someone the victim knew well, such as a neighbor, coworker or teacher (62 percent), or by a casual acquaintance (60 percent) were more likely to go unreported than crimes committed by a stranger (51 percent)....Estimates from the NCVS, which includes offenses both reported and not reported to police, complement those from the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting Program (UCR), which measures crimes reported to law enforcement agencies across the nation. During 2010, 40,974 households and 73,283 individuals age 12 and older were interviewed twice for the NCVS. (BJS Press Release Text) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) en_US
dc.subject Trends en_US
dc.subject Barriers to Reporting en_US
dc.subject Interpersonal Crime en_US
dc.subject Social Support en_US
dc.subject Disclosure en_US
dc.subject Crime Reporting en_US
dc.subject Robbery en_US
dc.subject Theft en_US
dc.subject Rape en_US
dc.subject Sexual Assault en_US
dc.subject Aggravated Assault en_US
dc.subject Burglary en_US
dc.subject Injury en_US
dc.subject Weapons en_US
dc.subject Victim to Offender Relationship en_US
dc.subject Survey Results en_US
dc.title Victimizations Not Reported to the Police en_US
dc.type Other en_US


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