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Does Better Health Reduce Domestic Violence and Illicit Drug Use?

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dc.contributor.author Coile, Courtney
dc.date.accessioned 2018-01-17T22:23:05Z
dc.date.available 2018-01-17T22:23:05Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Coile, Courtney (Ed.). (2017). Does Better Health Reduce Domestic Violence and Illicit Drug Use? Bulletin on Aging and Health, National Bureau of Economic Research: No. 1, 1-2. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.nber.org/aginghealth/2017no1/w22887.shtml
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/616
dc.description Newsletter en_US
dc.description.abstract In Health, Human Capital and Domestic Violence (NBER Working Paper No. 22887), researchers Nicholas Papageorge, Gwyn Pauley, Mardge Cohen, Tracey Wilson, Barton Hamilton, and Robert Pollak explore the effect of health improvements on domestic violence. Estimating a causal effect of health on domestic violence is made more challenging by the possibility that abuse may also affect health. Alternatively, omitted third factors could affect both health and violence. To overcome these difficulties, the researchers focus on whether an unexpected change in health due to a medical breakthrough is associated with a change in violence. Specifically, they look at how the introduction of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) for women infected with HIV affected their exposure to violence and illicit drug use. The researchers use data from the Women's Interagency HIV Study, a unique dataset that includes HIV-positive and HIV-negative women with similar levels of risky behavior. The study began in 1994, prior to the widespread introduction of HAART in 1996, and followed women over time. The researchers compare domestic violence and illicit drug use before and after the introduction of HAART for chronically ill HIV-positive women, who stood to benefit from the new treatment; healthy HIV-positive women and HIV-negative women serve as control groups to capture any changes over time in violence or drug use that are unrelated to the new health technology. [CVRL Note: this is only a summary of the research paper, which is behind a paywall]. (Author Text) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Bulletin on Aging and Health;1
dc.subject Study Overview en_US
dc.subject Intimate Partner Violence en_US
dc.subject Domestic Abuse en_US
dc.subject Victimization en_US
dc.subject Healthcare en_US
dc.subject Chronic Illness en_US
dc.subject Spouse Abuse en_US
dc.subject Battering en_US
dc.subject Treatment en_US
dc.subject Medical Consequences en_US
dc.subject Substance Abuse en_US
dc.subject Substance Use Disorder en_US
dc.subject Drug Abuse en_US
dc.subject Intervention en_US
dc.title Does Better Health Reduce Domestic Violence and Illicit Drug Use? en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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