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Systematic review of mental health disorders and intimate partner violence victimisation among military populations.

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dc.contributor.author Sparrow, Katherine
dc.contributor.author Kwan, Jamie
dc.contributor.author Howard, Louise
dc.contributor.author Fear, Nicola
dc.contributor.author MacManus, Deirdre
dc.date.accessioned 2017-11-30T11:25:14Z
dc.date.available 2017-11-30T11:25:14Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Sparrow, Katherine; Kwan, Jamie; Howard, Louise; Fear, Nicola; MacManus, Deirdre. (2017). Systematic review of mental health disorders and intimate partner violence victimisation among military populations. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 52(9), 1059–1080. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5581819/pdf/127_2017_Article_1423.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/404
dc.description.abstract Purpose: There is growing awareness of the problem of intimate partner violence (IPV) among military populations. IPV victimisation has been shown to be associated with mental disorder. A better understanding of the link between IPV and mental disorder is needed to inform service development to meet the needs of military families. We aimed to systematically review the literature on the association between IPV victimisation and mental health disorders among military personnel. Methods: Searches of four electronic databases (Embase, Medline, PsycINFO, and Web of Science) were supplemented by reference list screening. Heterogeneity among studies precluded a meta-analysis. Results: Thirteen studies were included. There was stronger evidence for an association between IPV and depression/alcohol problems than between IPV and PTSD. An association between IPV and mental health problems was more frequently found among veterans compared to active duty personnel. However, the link between IPV and alcohol misuse was more consistently found among active duty samples. Finally, among active duty personnel psychological IPV was more consistently associated with depression/alcohol problems than physical/sexual IPV. The review highlighted the lack of research on male IPV victimisation in the military. Conclusions: There is evidence that the burden of mental health need may be significant among military personnel who are victims of IPV. The influence of attitudes towards gender in the military on research in this area is discussed. Further research is needed to inform development of services and policy to reduce IPV victimisation and the mental health consequences among military personnel. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Spouse Abuse en_US
dc.subject Victimization en_US
dc.subject Substance Abuse en_US
dc.subject Men en_US
dc.subject Research en_US
dc.subject International en_US
dc.subject England en_US
dc.subject Domestic Violence
dc.subject Male Victims
dc.subject Alcohol Abuse
dc.subject Alcoholism
dc.title Systematic review of mental health disorders and intimate partner violence victimisation among military populations. en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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