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The contribution of gender-based violence and network trauma to gender differences in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

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dc.contributor.author Silove, Derrick
dc.contributor.author Baker, Jess R.
dc.contributor.author Mohsin, Mohammed
dc.contributor.author Teesson, Maree
dc.contributor.author Creamer, Mark
dc.contributor.author O'Donnell, Meaghan
dc.contributor.author Forbes, David
dc.date.accessioned 2017-11-03T12:15:17Z
dc.date.available 2017-11-03T12:15:17Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Silove, Derrick; Baker, Jess R.; Mohsin, Mohammed; Teesson, Maree; Creamer, Mark; O’Donnell, Meaghan; Forbes, David. (2017). The contribution of gender-based violence and network trauma to gender differences in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. PLoS One, 12(2). e0171879 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0171879
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/32
dc.description.abstract Background: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) occurs twice as commonly amongst women as men. Two common domains of trauma, network trauma and gender based violence (GBV), may contribute to this gender difference in PTSD rates. We examined data from a nationally representative sample of the Australian population to clarify the characteristics of these two trauma domains in their contributions to PTSD rates in men and women. Methods: We drew on data from the 2007 Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Well-being to assess gender differences across a comprehensive range of trauma domains, including (1) prevalence of lifetime exposure; (2) identification of an index trauma or DSM-IV Criterion A event; and (3) the likelihood of developing full DSM-IV PTSD symptoms once an index trauma was identified. Results: Men reported more traumatic events (TEs) overall but women reported twice the prevalence of lifetime PTSD (women, 13.4%; men, 6.3%). Women reported a threefold higher level of exposure to GBV and were seven times more likely to nominate GBV as the index trauma as compared to men. Women were twice more likely than men to identify a network trauma as the index trauma and more likely to meet full PTSD symptoms in relation to that event (women, 20.6%; men, 14.6%). Conclusion: Women are more likely to identify GBV and network trauma as an index trauma. Women’s far greater exposure to GBV contributes to their higher prevalence of PTSD. Women are markedly more likely to develop PTSD when network trauma is identified as the index trauma. Preventing exposure to GBV and providing timely interventions for acute psychological reactions following network trauma may assist in reducing PTSD rates amongst women. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Intimate Partner Violence en_US
dc.subject Domestic Violence en_US
dc.subject Rape en_US
dc.subject Assault en_US
dc.subject Violent Crime en_US
dc.subject International en_US
dc.subject Exposure to Violence
dc.title The contribution of gender-based violence and network trauma to gender differences in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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