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Factors associated with Type II trauma inoccupational groups working with traumatisedchildren: a systematic review [Author Copy]

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dc.contributor.author Sage, Clara
dc.contributor.author Brooks, Samantha
dc.contributor.author Greenberg, Neil
dc.date.accessioned 2021-02-09T16:58:04Z
dc.date.available 2021-02-09T16:58:04Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Sage, Clara A. M.; Brooks, Samantha K.; & Greenberg, Neil. (2017): Factors associated with Type II trauma in occupational groups working with traumatised children: asystematic review [Author Copy]. Journal of Mental Health, DOI: 10.1080/09638237.2017.1370630 en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.kcl.ac.uk/kcmhr/publications/assetfiles/2017/Sage2017.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/2188
dc.description.abstract Background: There is evidence that ‘‘Type II trauma’’ (TTT) - repeated exposure to traumatic events - can lead to the development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). TTT frequently occurs in occupational groups working with children who are themselves victims of trauma.Aim: To conduct a systematic review identifying risk factors for/protective factors against TTT-associated mental ill-health in employees working with traumatised children and explore how this type of work impacts upon social functioning.Method: Databases were searched for relevant studies and supplemented by hand searches.Results: 836 papers were found and 13 were included in the review. The key themes identified were coping mechanisms; social support; personality; demographics; occupational support;work-related stressors; traumatic exposure; organisational satisfaction; training/experience andimpact on life.Conclusion: Unhelpful coping strategies (e.g. denial) appeared to increase the risk of TTT. Training and strong support may be protective and work-related stressors (e.g. excessive workload) appeared detrimental. Despite some positive impacts of the work (e.g. becoming more appreciative of life) many negative impacts were identified, demonstrating the importance of minimising risk factors and maximising protective factors for staff at risk of TTT en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Kings College London en_US
dc.subject Systematic Review en_US
dc.subject Occupational Hazards en_US
dc.subject Vicarious Trauma en_US
dc.subject Secondary Trauma en_US
dc.subject Complex Trauma en_US
dc.subject Child Welfare en_US
dc.subject Child Abuse en_US
dc.subject Workplace Conditions en_US
dc.subject Coping en_US
dc.subject Organizational Support en_US
dc.subject Workload en_US
dc.subject Victim Advocacy en_US
dc.subject Victim Services en_US
dc.subject Burnout en_US
dc.title Factors associated with Type II trauma inoccupational groups working with traumatisedchildren: a systematic review [Author Copy] en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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