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Trends in Family Violence Are Not Causally Associated with COVID-19 Stay-at-Home Orders: a Commentary on Piquero et al.

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dc.contributor.author Gonzalez, Jennifer Reingle
dc.contributor.author Molsberry, Rebecca
dc.contributor.author Maskaly, Jonathan
dc.contributor.author Jetelina, Katelyn
dc.date.accessioned 2020-10-07T20:01:18Z
dc.date.available 2020-10-07T20:01:18Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.citation Reingle Gonzalez, J.M., Molsberry, R., Maskaly, J. et al. (2020). Trends in Family Violence Are Not Causally Associated with COVID-19 Stay-at-Home Orders: a Commentary on Piquero et al. American Journal of Criminal Justice. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12103-020-09574-w en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12103-020-09574-w
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/2169
dc.description.abstract COVID-19 has caused a wave of research publications in academic and pre-print outlets which have resulted in several high-profile retractions. While the breadth of emerging research has been instrumental in understanding and curbing the global pandemic in near real-time, unfortunately manuscripts with major methodological challenges have fallen through the cracks. In this perspective, we illustrate this issue in light of a recent manuscript by Piquero et al. (2020). In the study, a statistically significant association between stay-at-home orders and family violence was not detected; however, the authors widely disseminated a “12.5% increase in family violence” offenses to a variety of media outlets. This negligent dissemination of inaccurate research findings has important implications for policy and the virus mitigation efforts, which might urge policymakers to terminate stay-at-home orders in an effort to reduce family violence and other social risk factors. Changes may ultimately result in more COVID-related deaths as stay-at-home orders are prematurely and inappropriately lifted to prevent purported injuries in the home. Therefore, the widespread propagation of these claims in the absence of scientific evidence of an increase has great potential to cause harm. [CVRL Note: this article reviews research in "Staying Home, Staying Safe? A Short-Term Analysis of COVID-19 on Dallas Domestic Violence" and current state of knowledge about COVID-19 and family violence.] (Author Text) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Springer Open en_US
dc.subject Commentary en_US
dc.subject Stay-at-home Orders en_US
dc.subject Family Violence en_US
dc.subject Domestic Violence en_US
dc.subject Intimate Partner Violence en_US
dc.subject Pandemic en_US
dc.subject Diseases en_US
dc.subject Stress en_US
dc.subject Social Support en_US
dc.subject Employment en_US
dc.subject Research Ethics en_US
dc.title Trends in Family Violence Are Not Causally Associated with COVID-19 Stay-at-Home Orders: a Commentary on Piquero et al. en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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