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"They all laughed and asked me if I enjoyed having sex with those guys”: Exploring men’s lived experiences when reporting rape to police in South Africa

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dc.contributor.author Mgolozeli, Siyabulela Eric
dc.contributor.author Duma, Sinegugu Evidence
dc.date.accessioned 2020-08-28T21:02:50Z
dc.date.available 2020-08-28T21:02:50Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.citation Mgolozeli S.E.; Duma, S.E. (2020) “They all laughed and asked me if I enjoyed having sex with those guys”: Exploring men’s lived experiences when reporting rape to police in South Africa. PLOS ONE: 15(8), e0235044. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0235044 en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article/file?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0235044&type=printable
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/2029
dc.description.abstract Rape is the most demoralizing type of crime violating human rights worldwide. Research has primarily focused on children and women’s experiences of rape, even though victims include men and little documentation available concerning their experiences of reporting these incidents. The study aimed to investigate men’s experiences when reporting rape to the police. An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was used to collect and analyze qualitative data from a purposive sample of eleven men who were rape victims. The findings of the study revealed three superordinate and twenty-two subordinate themes. First, motivation for reporting rape to the police included self-protection from re-victimization, being killed, and prevalent prison cultural practice, seeking justice and answers for rape, moral duty, family support, and encouraging reports of the crime. Second, perceived barriers for reporting rape included fear of stigmatization and ridicule, unknown perpetrators, internalized homophobia, men’s preconceived prejudices, perceived justice system delays, fear of being killed, and protecting their reputation. Third, negative experiences when reporting rape included a long waiting period at the reception before opening a case file and the delayed responses of police investigating the rape scene. Also, there was discouragement from the police, disparaging behavior of police, victim-blaming, lack of communication with the victim about case progress and experiences of police homosexual intolerance. The findings show that most men were motivated to report rape to the police despite the perceived barriers and negative experiences they had with the police. Thus, this provides baseline evidence for strategies to be developed to encourage the reporting of rape. Each police station must provide dedicated personnel for professional and sensitive handling of all rape victims, including men. Furthermore, future studies should be conducted to evaluate rape victims’ satisfaction with the services provided by the police. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher PLoS One en_US
dc.subject Interview Results en_US
dc.subject Rape en_US
dc.subject Sexual Assault en_US
dc.subject Sexual Violence en_US
dc.subject Male Victims en_US
dc.subject Crime Reporting en_US
dc.subject Victim Strategies en_US
dc.subject Barriers to Reporting en_US
dc.subject Stigma en_US
dc.subject Masculinity en_US
dc.subject Police Response en_US
dc.subject Response to Victimization en_US
dc.subject Secondary Victimization en_US
dc.subject Blame en_US
dc.subject Blaming en_US
dc.subject Information Sharing en_US
dc.title "They all laughed and asked me if I enjoyed having sex with those guys”: Exploring men’s lived experiences when reporting rape to police in South Africa en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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