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Do early interventions prevent PTSD? A systematic review and meta-analysis of the safety and efficacy of early interventions after sexual assault

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dc.contributor.author Oosterbaan, Veerle
dc.contributor.author Covers, Milou
dc.contributor.author Bicanic, Iva
dc.contributor.author Huntjens, Rafaële
dc.contributor.author de Jongh, Ad
dc.date.accessioned 2020-08-11T21:20:38Z
dc.date.available 2020-08-11T21:20:38Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.citation Oosterbaan, Veerle; Covers, Milou; Bicanic, Iva; Huntjens, Rafaële; de Jongh, Ad. (2019). Do early interventions prevent PTSD? A systematic review and meta-analysis of the safety and efficacy of early interventions after sexual assault. European Journal of Psychotraumatology en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/20008198.2019.1682932
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/1943
dc.description.abstract Objective: To review the safety and efficacy of early interventions after sexual assault in reducing or preventing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Method: Systematic searches were performed on studies (1980–2018) that examined the efficacy of interventions for PTSD within 3 months after sexual assault. Results: The review identified 7 studies (n = 350) with high risk of bias that investigated 5 interventions. Only two studies reported on safety. Contact with the authors of six studies provided no indications for the occurrence of adverse events. Two studies reported the efficacy using PTSD diagnosis as dependent variable but found no difference between groups. All studies reported on efficacy using PTSD severity as dependent variable. For the meta-analysis, 4 studies (n = 293) were included yielding significantly greater reductions of PTSD severity than standard care at 2 to 12 months follow-up (g = −0.23, 95% CI [−0.46, 0.00]), but not at 1 to 6 weeks post-intervention (g = −0.28, 95% CI [−0.57, 0.02]). The heterogeneity of the interventions precluded further analyses. Discussion: Findings suggest that early interventions can lead to durable effects on PTSD severity after sexual assault. However, due to limited availability of data, it is impossible to draw definite conclusions about safety and efficacy of early interventions, and their potential to prevent PTSD. [CVRL Notes: inclusion period covers interventions administered within 72 hours, which is a commonly repeated time frame for crisis response.] (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Taylor & Francis en_US
dc.subject Systematic Review en_US
dc.subject Sexual Assault en_US
dc.subject PTSD en_US
dc.subject Post-traumatic Stress en_US
dc.subject Posttraumatic Stress en_US
dc.subject Efficacy en_US
dc.subject Interventions en_US
dc.subject Early Interventions en_US
dc.subject Early Response en_US
dc.subject Rape en_US
dc.subject Sexual Violence en_US
dc.subject Crisis Intervention en_US
dc.subject Emergency Response en_US
dc.subject Forensic Examinations en_US
dc.subject Video en_US
dc.subject Therapy en_US
dc.subject Counseling en_US
dc.subject Psychological Consequences en_US
dc.subject Psycho-education en_US
dc.subject Symptoms en_US
dc.subject EMDR en_US
dc.subject Prolonged Exposure en_US
dc.subject Cognitive Restructuring en_US
dc.subject Cognitive Processing en_US
dc.subject Treatment Modalities en_US
dc.subject Safety en_US
dc.title Do early interventions prevent PTSD? A systematic review and meta-analysis of the safety and efficacy of early interventions after sexual assault en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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