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The Link Between Interpersonal Violence and Animal Abuse

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dc.contributor.author Vincent, Aviva
dc.contributor.author McDonald, Shelby
dc.contributor.author Poe, Bethanie
dc.contributor.author Deisner, Vicki
dc.date.accessioned 2020-07-31T20:42:26Z
dc.date.available 2020-07-31T20:42:26Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.citation Vincent, Aviva; McDonald, Shelby; Poe, Bethanie; Deisner, Vicki. (2019). The Link Between Interpersonal Violence and Animal Abuse. Society Register: 3(3), 83-101. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://nationallinkcoalition.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/Social-Work-Vincent-McDonald-Poe-Deisner.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/1913
dc.description.abstract In 2018, more homes in the US have pets than those that have children. Though pets are regarded as property by US law, a majority of people identify pets as part of the family unit. Animal abuse and cruelty have been identified as a potential indicator and precursor to interpersonal violence (IPV). Moreover, child maltreatment, domestic violence, elder abuse, and animal abuse co-occur in households and communities link together to indicate the nexus of these heinous crimes; these co-occurring forms of violence have been increasingly referred to as The Link, to indicate the linked violence. However, there is an incongruence in the definition of animal abuse and cruelty; thus, documenting cases, bringing charges, and achieving a conviction is difficult. Furthermore, the initial education to learn of these topics in human service professions, such as social work, remains absent from many curricula. In practice, cross-reporting of suspected abuse or neglect is a vital mechanism for connecting human and animal professionals to address the issues between human and animal welfare systems. This sharing of information can increase the likelihood that clients experiencing IPV will receive comprehensive services that can improve their level of safety and quality of life. By providing professionals with education for indicators of abuse, and strategies for how to make a report, communities can build stronger support networks for those in need. Herein, Ohio legislation and current community efforts serve as a case study to define animal abuse, delineate transdisciplinary factors for relevance, and make recommendations for addressing this vital social welfare need. The strategies within this case-study are encouraged to be adapted and applied nationally and internationally. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher National Link Coalition en_US
dc.subject Case Study en_US
dc.subject Interpersonal Violence en_US
dc.subject Family Violence en_US
dc.subject Child Abuse en_US
dc.subject Child Maltreatment en_US
dc.subject Domestic Abuse en_US
dc.subject Domestic Violence en_US
dc.subject Intimate Partner Violence en_US
dc.subject Elder Abuse en_US
dc.subject Pets en_US
dc.subject Companion Animals en_US
dc.subject Pet Abuse en_US
dc.subject Animal Abuse en_US
dc.subject Co-occurrence en_US
dc.subject Multitype Victimization en_US
dc.subject Interagency Collaboration en_US
dc.subject Barriers to Reporting en_US
dc.subject Crime Reporting en_US
dc.subject Social Workers en_US
dc.title The Link Between Interpersonal Violence and Animal Abuse en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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