center for victim research repository

What Trauma Looks Like for Incarcerated Men: A Study of Men’s Lifetime Trauma Exposure in Two State Prisons

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Morrison, Maria
dc.contributor.author Pettus-David, Carrie
dc.contributor.author Renn, Tanya
dc.contributor.author Veeh, Christopher
dc.contributor.author Weatherly, Christopher
dc.date.accessioned 2020-07-21T20:16:13Z
dc.date.available 2020-07-21T20:16:13Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Morrison, Maria; Pettus-David, Carrie; Renn, Tanya; Veeh, Christopher; Weatherly, Christopher. (2018). What Trauma Looks Like for Incarcerated Men: A Study of Men’s Lifetime Trauma Exposure in Two State Prisons. Florida State University, 28 pgs. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://ijrd.csw.fsu.edu/sites/g/files/upcbnu1766/files/media/images/publication_pdfs/trauma_incar_men_working_paper.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/1881
dc.description Report en_US
dc.description.abstract While it is understood that high rates of trauma exposure are common among incarcerated male populations, there is limited data on the nature of the trauma exposure. This study examined the trauma histories of a randomly selected sample of 67 men incarcerated in the Missouri Department of Corrections. The analyses revealed several patterns among study participants, including near universal trauma exposure in adolescence with the most frequent exposures involving witnessing or being proximate to violent deaths of family and friends. The mean age of exposure for all trauma exposure types measured was 17 years old. We found that for this group of incarcerated men, trauma exposures in childhood tended to result more from community violence than child maltreatment (e.g., abuse and neglect by caregivers). The study results also suggested that further research may be needed into the effects of close proximity to violent death during this particular window in adolescent development. Neuroscience research has shown that this is a “sensitive period” in brain development with potential negative outcomes in early adulthood, including emotional regulation deficits that can potentially lead to increased risk of arrest. Further research on trauma exposure within this population is needed both to appropriately serve men while in prison or in the process of reentering society and to support efforts to reduce mass incarceration. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Florida State University en_US
dc.subject Interview Results en_US
dc.subject Survivors of Trauma en_US
dc.subject Incarcerated Victims en_US
dc.subject Children Exposed to Violence en_US
dc.subject Traumatic Loss en_US
dc.subject Victimization en_US
dc.subject Male Victims en_US
dc.subject Victim-Offender Overlap en_US
dc.subject Prisoners en_US
dc.title What Trauma Looks Like for Incarcerated Men: A Study of Men’s Lifetime Trauma Exposure in Two State Prisons en_US
dc.type Other en_US


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search


Browse

My Account