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Threading, Stitching, and Storytelling: Using CBPR and Blackfoot Knowledge and Cultural Practices to Improve Domestic Violence Services for Indigenous Women

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dc.contributor.author Jackson, Emily Lindsay
dc.contributor.author Coleman, Julie
dc.contributor.author Strikes with a Gun, Gail
dc.contributor.author Sweet Grass, Doris
dc.date.accessioned 2020-07-06T21:18:56Z
dc.date.available 2020-07-06T21:18:56Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.citation Jackson, Emily Lindsay; Coleman, Julie; Strikes with a Gun, Gail; Sweet Grass, Doris. (2015). Threading, Stitching, and Storytelling: Using CBPR and Blackfoot Knowledge and Cultural Practices to Improve Domestic Violence Services for Indigenous Women. Journal of Indigenous Social Development: 4(1), 27 pgs. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://journalhosting.ucalgary.ca/index.php/jisd/article/view/58475/43979
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/1869
dc.description.abstract This article discusses a community-based participatory research (CBPR) project at two women’s emergency shelters in rural southwestern Alberta. The CBPR project aimed to improve shelter services on and off reserve in our area by engaging the voices of Indigenous women who had experienced domestic violence. The project’s methods were participatory appraisal and arts-based work re-magined through Blackfoot cultural practices of storytelling and shawl making. The project created a rare safe space where thirteen Blackfoot women emphasised DV services should provide opportunities to connect with family and community and role model Blackfoot knowledge. Role modelling traditional knowledges aids developing life and parenting skills, opening up pathways for Indigenous women to more positive, secure futures. These women’s recommendations impelled this article to challenge the individualized case management model and discourses of cultural competence dominating Canadian DV services, which isolate and marginalize Indigenous women when they seek help. We highlight resources existing in Blackfoot communities to manage and prevent violence by protecting and facilitating Indigenous women’s connections to their communities and cultures, and offer ways to utilize these more effectively in service settings. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Journal of Indigenous Social Development en_US
dc.subject Community-based Participatory Research en_US
dc.subject Community-based Participation en_US
dc.subject Researcher-Practitioner Partnerships en_US
dc.subject Interagency Collaboration en_US
dc.subject Community Perceptions en_US
dc.subject Survivors of Trauma en_US
dc.subject Victim Voice en_US
dc.subject Victim Input en_US
dc.subject Social Support en_US
dc.subject Indigenous Populations en_US
dc.subject Traditional Healing en_US
dc.subject Empowerment en_US
dc.subject Cultural Relevance en_US
dc.subject Culturally Specific en_US
dc.subject Case Management en_US
dc.subject Marginalized Populations en_US
dc.subject Historically Marginalized en_US
dc.subject Violence Against Women en_US
dc.subject Indigenous Women en_US
dc.title Threading, Stitching, and Storytelling: Using CBPR and Blackfoot Knowledge and Cultural Practices to Improve Domestic Violence Services for Indigenous Women en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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