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Why Extending Measurements of ‘Success’ in Domestic Violence Perpetrator Programmes Matters for Social Work

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dc.contributor.author Westmarland, Nicole
dc.contributor.author Kelly, Liz
dc.date.accessioned 2020-06-09T21:47:28Z
dc.date.available 2020-06-09T21:47:28Z
dc.date.issued 2013
dc.identifier.citation Westmarland, Nicole; Kelly, Liz. (2013). Why Extending Measurements of ‘Success’ in Domestic Violence Perpetrator Programmes Matters for Social Work. The British Journal of Social Work: 43(6), 1092–1110. https://doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/bcs049 en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://academic.oup.com/bjsw/article/43/6/1092/1653332
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/1827
dc.description.abstract Ever since domestic violence gained prominence on the social policy agenda, the focus of interventions has been on victims. A range of studies on social work/social welfare note the invisibility and/or lack of interventions aimed at domestic violence perpetrators. The exception has been perpetrator programmes (known in the USA as batterer intervention programmes, or BIPs), which increasingly receive referrals from social workers. However, there remains ongoing disagreement internationally about their effectiveness. Part of this disagreement stems from the failure to consider a broad range of potential outcomes, with most research focusing on an overly narrow understanding of what ‘success’ means (as no subsequent police callouts or incidents of physical violence). A total of seventy-three interviews with men on programmes, their partners/ex-partners, programme staff, and funders and commissioners were undertaken to explore what ‘success’ meant from their perspectives. Findings reveal that success needs to be redefined and connected not just to criminal justice, but also to health and social care agendas. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Oxford University Press en_US
dc.subject Interview Results en_US
dc.subject Batterer Intervention Programs en_US
dc.subject Perpetrators en_US
dc.subject Offenders en_US
dc.subject Interventions en_US
dc.subject Victim Voice en_US
dc.subject Victim Input en_US
dc.subject Effectiveness en_US
dc.subject Success en_US
dc.subject Domestic Violence en_US
dc.subject Intimate Partner Violence en_US
dc.subject Survivors en_US
dc.subject Practitioners en_US
dc.subject Victim Outcomes en_US
dc.subject Criminal Justice en_US
dc.subject Children Exposed to Violence en_US
dc.subject Relationship Skills en_US
dc.subject Empowerment en_US
dc.subject Victim Safety en_US
dc.subject Offender Treatment
dc.subject BIPs
dc.title Why Extending Measurements of ‘Success’ in Domestic Violence Perpetrator Programmes Matters for Social Work en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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