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Who has to tell their trauma story and how hard will it be? Influence of cultural stigma and narrative redemption on the storying of sexual violence

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dc.contributor.author Delker, Brianna
dc.contributor.author Salton, Rowan
dc.contributor.author McLean, Kate
dc.contributor.author Syed, Moin
dc.date.accessioned 2020-06-09T21:47:18Z
dc.date.available 2020-06-09T21:47:18Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.citation Delker BC, Salton R, McLean KC, Syed M (2020) Who has to tell their trauma story and how hard will it be? Influence of cultural stigma and narrative redemption on the storying of sexual violence. PLoS ONE 15(6): e0234201. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0234201 en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article/file?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0234201&type=printable
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/1825
dc.description.abstract Although survivors of sexual violence have shared their stories with the public on social media and mass media platforms in growing numbers, less is known about how general audiences perceive such trauma stories. These perceptions can have profound consequences for survivor mental health. In the present experimental, vignette-based studies, we anticipated that cultural stigma surrounding sexual violence and cultural preference for positive (redemptive) endings to adversity in the United States (U.S.) would shape perceptions. Four samples of U.S. adults (N = 1872) rated first-person narratives of 6 more stigmatizing (i.e., sexual violence) or less stigmatizing (e.g., natural disaster) traumatic events. Confirming pre-registered hypotheses, sexual violence trauma (versus other types of trauma) stories were perceived as more difficult to tell, and their storytellers less likeable, even when they had redemptive endings. Disconfirming other pre-registered hypotheses, redemptive (versus negative) story endings did not boost the perceived likelihood or obligation to share a sexual violence trauma story. Rather, redemptive (versus negative) story endings only boosted the perceived likelihood, obligation, and ease of telling other, less stigmatizing types of trauma stories. Findings suggest that sexual violence survivors do not benefit, to the same degree as other survivors, from telling their stories with the culturally valued narrative template of redemption. Clinical and societal implications of the less receptive climate for sexual violence stories are discussed. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher PLoS One en_US
dc.subject Research en_US
dc.subject Narratives en_US
dc.subject Trauma en_US
dc.subject Victim Voice en_US
dc.subject Sexual Violence en_US
dc.subject Rape en_US
dc.subject Stigma en_US
dc.subject Community Perceptions en_US
dc.subject Survivors en_US
dc.subject Mental Health en_US
dc.subject Psychological Consequences en_US
dc.subject Cultural Factors en_US
dc.subject Individualism en_US
dc.subject Disclosure en_US
dc.subject Barriers to Reporting en_US
dc.subject Blaming en_US
dc.subject Blame en_US
dc.subject Credibility en_US
dc.title Who has to tell their trauma story and how hard will it be? Influence of cultural stigma and narrative redemption on the storying of sexual violence en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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