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Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms in Context: Examining Trauma Responses to Violent Exposures and Homicide Death Among Black Males in Urban Neighborhoods

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dc.contributor.author Smith, Jocelyn
dc.contributor.author Patton, Desmond
dc.date.accessioned 2020-06-02T15:55:48Z
dc.date.available 2020-06-02T15:55:48Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.citation Smith, Jocelyn; Patton, Desmond. (2016). Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms in Context: Examining Trauma Responses to Violent Exposures and Homicide Death Among Black Males in Urban Neighborhoods. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry: 86(2), 212-223. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.bhjustice.org/assets/OpenAccess/smith.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/1812
dc.description.abstract Concentrated disadvantage in urban communities places young Black men at disproportionate risk for exposure to violence and trauma. Homicide, a health disparity, positions Black males vulnerable to premature violent death and traumatic loss, particularly when peers are murdered.Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been demonstrated as a health consequence for middle-income and White homicide survivors; however, understandings of traumatic stress among young Black men situated in contexts of chronic violence exposure remains limited.Guided by phenomenological variant of ecological systems theory (PVEST), the current study used in-depth qualitative interviews (average length: 90 min) to examine the presence and expression of traumatic stress symptoms among 37 young Black men (18–24) in Baltimore who experienced the homicide death of a loved one. Participants were recruited over 18 months through fieldwork at a large organization that serves Baltimore youth and young adults.Confidential participant interviews were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim, coded, and analyzed in ATLAS.ti. Pseudonyms were assigned to all participants. More than 70% of participants reported experiencing 2 or more Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM–V)–defined posttraumatic stress symptoms. Hypervigilance was most frequently experienced and expressed as being on point. Findings identify the prevalence of traumatic stress symptoms among young Black men in urban contexts; identify contextually specific expressions of traumatic stress; and, present implications for the mental health and clinical treatment of Black males living in environments where no “post” exists. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Global Alliance for Behavioral Health and Social Justice en_US
dc.subject Interview Results en_US
dc.subject Posttraumatic Stress en_US
dc.subject Trauma en_US
dc.subject Survivors of Trauma en_US
dc.subject Survivors of Harm en_US
dc.subject Exposure to Violence en_US
dc.subject Witness to Violence en_US
dc.subject PTSD en_US
dc.subject Health Consequences en_US
dc.subject Homicide Survivors en_US
dc.subject Covictims en_US
dc.subject Covictimization en_US
dc.subject Co-victimization en_US
dc.subject Co-victims en_US
dc.subject Loved Ones en_US
dc.subject Violent Death en_US
dc.subject Murder en_US
dc.subject Black en_US
dc.subject African American en_US
dc.subject African-American en_US
dc.subject Urban en_US
dc.subject Repeat Victimization en_US
dc.subject Network Trauma en_US
dc.subject Community Violence en_US
dc.subject Youth en_US
dc.subject Young Adults en_US
dc.subject Young People en_US
dc.subject Teens en_US
dc.subject High Crime Neighborhoods en_US
dc.subject Disadvantaged en_US
dc.subject Grief en_US
dc.subject Male Victims en_US
dc.title Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms in Context: Examining Trauma Responses to Violent Exposures and Homicide Death Among Black Males in Urban Neighborhoods en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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