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Estimating the Financial Costs of Crime Victimization

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dc.contributor.author Lugo, Kristina
dc.contributor.author Przybylski, Roger
dc.contributor.author Farley, Erin
dc.contributor.author Howley, Susan
dc.contributor.author Liberman, Akiva
dc.contributor.author Yahner, Jennifer
dc.contributor.author Dusenbery, Malore
dc.contributor.author Ervin, Storm
dc.contributor.author Henderson, Erica
dc.contributor.author Welsh-Loveman, Jeremy
dc.contributor.author Vasquez-Noriega, Carla
dc.contributor.author Garcia, Olivia
dc.date.accessioned 2020-03-11T16:10:32Z
dc.date.available 2020-03-11T16:10:32Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Lugo, Kristina; Przybylski, Roger. (2018). Estimating the Financial Costs of Crime Victimization. Justice Research and Statistics Association, NCJ 254010, 263 pgs. en_US
dc.identifier.govdoc NCJ 254010
dc.identifier.uri https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/254010.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/1689
dc.description Report en_US
dc.description.abstract Despite reductions in U.S. crime rates in recent decades, crime victimization continues to be a pressing problem with enormous societal costs. Currently available national estimates of victimization costs are in the hundreds of billions of dollars each year –equivalent to between 2 percent and 6 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product. Understanding the costs of victimization and the components that comprise them can help policymakers and practitioners use resources more efficiently. This project, conducted by the Justice Research and Statistics Association (JRSA) in partnership with the Urban Institute (Urban) and the National Center for Victims of Crime (NCVC), is an assessment of the field of cost of victimization research. The product is a menu of recommendations for future research studies and practitioner tools to advance the field. One objective of the project was to keep the focus squarely on the victims, and consider what information is most needed by those who serve them. Relatedly, another objective was to recognize that even if the proximate victim is a business, the government, or non-profit organization, individuals still suffer. Given the victim-centered focus, the project team conducted several primary data collections designed to obtain input from practitioners and victims about their experiences and needs. Focus groups were conducted with three practitioner groups: Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) compensation and assistance administrators, State Administering Agency (SAA) and state Statistical Analysis Center (SAC) directors, and civil attorneys who pursue tort claims for damages for crime victims. As well, the project team conducted a nationwide survey of victim service providers and a smaller survey of victimization survivors. The project team also re-framed the taxonomy of victimization costs pioneered and revised by Cohen over the years (Cohen, 2005, e.g.) from the perspective of various practitioner users –based on who covers different costs –and adds factors that may increase or decrease costs they may be estimating. The project team also conducted a literature review that consists of two major sections: one focused on how costs of victimization are estimated and the other on estimation methods and data sources concerning the incidence, prevalence, and concentration of victimization. (Author Text) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Justice Research and Statistics Association (JRSA) en_US
dc.subject Focus Groups en_US
dc.subject Survey Results en_US
dc.subject Literature Review en_US
dc.subject Costs of Crime en_US
dc.subject Cost of Victimization en_US
dc.subject Economic Burden en_US
dc.subject Financial Consequences en_US
dc.subject Financial Impact en_US
dc.subject Compensation en_US
dc.subject Financial Burden en_US
dc.subject Compensable Crimes en_US
dc.subject Restitution en_US
dc.subject Repayment en_US
dc.subject Financial Assistance en_US
dc.subject Monetary Loss en_US
dc.subject Monetary Support en_US
dc.subject VOCA Administrators en_US
dc.subject VOCA-funded en_US
dc.subject State Administrators en_US
dc.subject Civil Attorneys en_US
dc.subject Tort Claims en_US
dc.subject Damages en_US
dc.subject Jury Awards en_US
dc.subject Statistical Analysis Centers en_US
dc.subject SAC en_US
dc.subject State Administering Agency en_US
dc.subject Victim Input en_US
dc.subject Victim Voice en_US
dc.subject Consequences en_US
dc.subject Harms en_US
dc.subject Emotional Burden en_US
dc.subject Financial Harms en_US
dc.subject Research Methods en_US
dc.subject Tangible Costs en_US
dc.subject Intangible Costs en_US
dc.title Estimating the Financial Costs of Crime Victimization en_US
dc.type Other en_US


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