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Homelessness and Money Mismanagement in Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans

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dc.contributor.author Elbogen, Eric
dc.contributor.author Sullivan, Connor
dc.contributor.author Wolfe, James
dc.contributor.author Wagner, Henry Ryan
dc.contributor.author Beckham, Jean
dc.date.accessioned 2019-09-17T15:12:25Z
dc.date.available 2019-09-17T15:12:25Z
dc.date.issued 2013
dc.identifier.citation Elbogen, Eric; Sullivan, Connor; Wolfe, James; Wagner, Henry Ryan; Beckham, Jean. (2013). Homelessness and Money Mismanagement in Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans. American Journal of Public Health: 103(Supplement 2), 248-254. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3919675/pdf/AJPH.2013.301335.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/1562
dc.description.abstract Objectives. We examined the empirical link between money mismanagement and subsequent homelessness among veterans. Methods. We used a random sample of Iraq and Afghanistan War era veterans from the National Post-Deployment Adjustment Survey in 2009–2011. Results. Veterans were randomly selected from a roster of all US military service members in Operation Iraqi Freedom or Operation Enduring Freedom who were separated from active duty or in the Reserves/National Guard. Veterans (n = 1090) from 50 states and all military branches completed 2 waves of data collection 1 year apart (79% retention rate). Thirty percent reported money mismanagement (e.g., bouncing or forging a check, going over one’s credit limit, falling victim to a money scam in the past year). Multivariate analysis revealed money mismanagement (odds ratio [OR] = 4.09, 95% CI = 1.87, 8.94) was associated with homelessness in the next year, as were arrest history (OR = 2.65, 95% CI = 1.33, 5.29), mental health diagnosis (OR = 2.59, 95% CI = 1.26, 5.33), and income (OR = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.13, 0.71). Conclusions. Money mismanagement, reported by a substantial number of veterans, was related to a higher rate of subsequent homelessness. The findings have implications for policymakers and clinicians, suggesting that financial education programs offered by the US Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs may be targeted to effectively address veteran homelessness. [CVRL Note: being a victim of a scam is included as a money mismanagement activity.] (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher American Journal of Public Health en_US
dc.subject Survey Results en_US
dc.subject Military en_US
dc.subject Veterans en_US
dc.subject Service Members en_US
dc.subject Scams en_US
dc.subject Monetary Loss en_US
dc.subject Victimization en_US
dc.subject Financial Victimization en_US
dc.subject Financial Crime en_US
dc.subject Financial Loss en_US
dc.subject Economic Crimes en_US
dc.subject Homeless en_US
dc.subject People Who Live Outside en_US
dc.subject Experiencing Housing Instability en_US
dc.subject Money en_US
dc.subject Fraud en_US
dc.title Homelessness and Money Mismanagement in Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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