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Why Asking ‘Where’ Matters When Working with Youth Exposed to Violence

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dc.contributor.author Butcher, Fred
dc.date.accessioned 2019-08-08T19:03:54Z
dc.date.available 2019-08-08T19:03:54Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.citation Butcher, Fred. (2016). Why Asking ‘Where’ Matters When Working with Youth Exposed to Violence. Juvenile Justice Information Exchange. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://jjie.org/2016/10/26/why-asking-where-matters-when-working-with-youth-exposed-to-violence/335057/
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/1498
dc.description Report en_US
dc.description.abstract We used data from Ohio’s Behavioral Health Juvenile Justice (BHJJ) initiative to examine whether location and social context were important aspects to measuring ETV. Ohio’s BHJJ initiative is a statewide diversion program that provides community-based treatment to juvenile justice-involved youth with behavioral health issues. As part of the program, treatment providers and juvenile courts have participated in extensive data collection that has provided evaluators and the state a wealth of information on the program’s effectiveness as well as the youth’s behavioral health needs. For this study, recently published in Criminal Justice and Behavior, we examined self-reported ETV in 2,124 BHJJ youth. Exposure to violence is so prevalent in juvenile justice-involved youth that understanding this phenomenon in this population is critical to reducing the likelihood of their continued involvement with the justice system. [CVRL Note: contact the CVR Research Librarian to request the full study article, "Polyvictimization Across Social Contexts: Home, School, and Neighborhood Violence Exposure."] (Author Text) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Juvenile Justice Information Exchange en_US
dc.subject Research Overview en_US
dc.subject Study Overview en_US
dc.subject Discussion en_US
dc.subject Commentary en_US
dc.subject Youth en_US
dc.subject Juvenile en_US
dc.subject Mental Health en_US
dc.subject Victim-Offender Overlap en_US
dc.subject Treatment en_US
dc.subject Behavioral Health Interventions en_US
dc.subject Violence Interruption en_US
dc.subject Intervention en_US
dc.subject Outcomes en_US
dc.subject Community-engaged en_US
dc.subject Violent Crime en_US
dc.subject Exposure to Violence en_US
dc.subject Trauma en_US
dc.subject Behavioral Problems en_US
dc.subject Justice-Involved en_US
dc.subject Adverse Childhood Experiences en_US
dc.subject System-involved en_US
dc.subject Criminal History en_US
dc.subject Detention en_US
dc.subject Minors en_US
dc.subject Teens en_US
dc.subject Children Exposed to Violence en_US
dc.subject Witness to Violence en_US
dc.subject Community Violence en_US
dc.subject Multitype Victimization en_US
dc.subject Polyvictimization en_US
dc.subject Poly-victimization en_US
dc.subject Repeat Victimization en_US
dc.subject Serial Victimization en_US
dc.title Why Asking ‘Where’ Matters When Working with Youth Exposed to Violence en_US
dc.type Other en_US


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