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Intimate partner violence and specific substance use disorders: Findings from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions

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dc.contributor.author Smith, Philip
dc.contributor.author Homish, Gregory
dc.contributor.author Leonard, Kenneth
dc.contributor.author Cornelius, Jack
dc.date.accessioned 2019-08-08T18:51:05Z
dc.date.available 2019-08-08T18:51:05Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.citation Smith, Philip; Homish, Gregory; Leonard, Kenneth; Cornelius, Jack. (2012). Intimate partner violence and specific substance use disorders: Findings from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 26(2), 236-245. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3883081/pdf/nihms535008.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/1490
dc.description Journal Article en_US
dc.description.abstract The association between substance use and intimate partner violence (IPV) is robust. It is less clear how the use of specific substances relates to relationship violence. This study examined IPV perpetration and victimization related to the following specific substance use disorders: alcohol, cannabis, cocaine and opioid. The poly-substance use of alcohol and cocaine, as well as alcohol and marijuana were also examined. Data were analyzed from wave two of the National Epidemiologic Study on Alcohol and Related Conditions (2004–2005). Associations between substance use disorders and IPV were tested using logistic regression models while controlling for important covariates and accounting for the complex survey design. Alcohol use disorders and cocaine use disorders were most strongly associated with IPV perpetration, while cannabis use disorders and opioid use disorders were most strongly associated with IPV victimization. A diagnosis of both an alcohol use disorder and cannabis use disorder decreased the likelihood of IPV perpetration compared to each individual substance use disorder. A diagnosis of both an alcohol use disorder and cocaine use disorder increased likelihood of reporting IPV perpetration compared to alcohol use disorders alone, but decreased likelihood of perpetration compared to a cocaine use disorder diagnosis alone. Overall, substance use disorders were consistently related to intimate partner violence after controlling for important covariates. These results provide further evidence for the important link between substance use disorders and IPV, and add to our knowledge of which specific substances may be related to relationship violence. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Psychology of Addictive Behaviors en_US
dc.subject Survey Results en_US
dc.subject Offender en_US
dc.subject Perpetrator en_US
dc.subject Victim en_US
dc.subject Risk Factors en_US
dc.subject Outcomes en_US
dc.subject Assessment en_US
dc.subject Intimate Partner Violence en_US
dc.subject Substance Abuse en_US
dc.subject Cannabis en_US
dc.subject Marijuana en_US
dc.subject Alcohol Abuse en_US
dc.subject Opioids en_US
dc.subject Substance Use Disorder en_US
dc.subject Alcohol-related Victimization en_US
dc.subject Drug-related Victimization en_US
dc.subject Victimization en_US
dc.subject Behavioral Problems en_US
dc.subject High-risk Behavior en_US
dc.title Intimate partner violence and specific substance use disorders: Findings from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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