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Use of Mental Health Screening Instruments by Non-Medical Helping Professionals

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dc.contributor.author Simmons, Catherine
dc.contributor.author Whalley, Anna
dc.contributor.author Beck, J. Gayle
dc.date.accessioned 2019-07-29T14:17:45Z
dc.date.available 2019-07-29T14:17:45Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.citation Simmons, Catherine; Whalley, Anna; Beck, J. Gayle. (2014). Use of Mental Health Screening Instruments by Non-Medical Helping Professionals. Journal of Interpersonal Violence: 29(11), 2068-2090. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.memphis.edu/psychology/research/athenadocs/mental_health_screening.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/1447
dc.description.abstract When screening women intimate partner violence (IPV) survivors for mental health concerns, helping professionals must balance the very real concerns that arise with diagnostic labels with the equally real difficulties related to mental health problems. To better understand whether and how mental health screening tools can be more useful in this process, the current study reports findings from an online needs assessment. The nationally representative sample included 325 professionals who work with IPV survivors in United States. Overall, participants have a positive attitude about assessing mental health concerns even though most do not conduct such assessments. From this, the following four areas are highlighted: (a) a need for training, (b) the appropriateness of screening, (c) factors that limit use, and (d) assessment tools. Findings also suggest it may be beneficial to develop instruments and/or protocols that are tailored to the unique needs/experiences of IPV survivors. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Journal of Interpersonal Violence en_US
dc.subject Survey Results en_US
dc.subject Victim Services en_US
dc.subject Service Providers en_US
dc.subject Practitioners en_US
dc.subject Needs Assessment en_US
dc.subject Training for Service Providers en_US
dc.subject Professional Development en_US
dc.subject Skill-building en_US
dc.subject Screening en_US
dc.subject Assessment en_US
dc.subject Mental Health en_US
dc.subject Mental Wellness en_US
dc.subject Mental Illness en_US
dc.subject Trauma en_US
dc.subject Stigma en_US
dc.subject Mental Health Conditions en_US
dc.subject PTSD en_US
dc.subject Posttraumatic Stress en_US
dc.subject Anxiety en_US
dc.subject Depression en_US
dc.subject Intimate Partner Violence en_US
dc.subject Domestic Violence en_US
dc.subject Domestic Abuse en_US
dc.subject Partner Abuse en_US
dc.subject Relationship Violence en_US
dc.subject Victim Advocates en_US
dc.subject Non-medical en_US
dc.subject Social Services en_US
dc.subject Legal Aid en_US
dc.subject Faith-based en_US
dc.subject Community Perceptions en_US
dc.subject Standardization en_US
dc.subject Victim Needs en_US
dc.subject Help Seeking en_US
dc.subject Victim Safety en_US
dc.title Use of Mental Health Screening Instruments by Non-Medical Helping Professionals en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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