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Parent–Child Interaction Therapy With Physically Abusive Parents: Efficacy for Reducing Future Abuse Reports

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dc.contributor.author Chaffin, Mark
dc.contributor.author Silovsky, Jane
dc.contributor.author Funderburk, Beverly
dc.contributor.author Valle, Linda Anne
dc.contributor.author Brestan, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.author Balachova, Tatiana
dc.contributor.author Jackson, Shelli
dc.contributor.author Lensgraf, Jay
dc.contributor.author Bonner, Barbara
dc.date.accessioned 2019-07-16T20:26:14Z
dc.date.available 2019-07-16T20:26:14Z
dc.date.issued 2004
dc.identifier.citation Chaffin, Mark; Silovsky, Jane; Funderburk, Beverly; Valle, Linda Anne; Brestan, Elizabeth; Balachova, Tatiana; Jackson, Shelli; Lensgraf, Jay; Bonner, Barbara. (2004). Parent–Child Interaction Therapy With Physically Abusive Parents: Efficacy for Reducing Future Abuse Reports. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 72(3), 500-510. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cssr.berkeley.edu/cwscmsreports/LatinoPracticeAdvisory/PRACTICE_Evidence_Based_Parent_Training/PCIT/Chaffin%202004.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/1392
dc.description Journal Article en_US
dc.description.abstract A randomized trial was conducted to test the efficacy and sufficiency of parent–child interaction therapy (PCIT) in preventing re-reports of physical abuse among abusive parents. Physically abusive parents (N 110) were randomly assigned to one of three intervention conditions: (a) PCIT, (b) PCIT plus individualized enhanced services, or (c) a standard community-based parenting group. Participants had multiple past child welfare reports, severe parent-to-child violence, low household income, and significant levels of depression, substance abuse, and antisocial behavior. At a median follow-up of 850 days, 19% of parents assigned to PCIT had a re-report for physical abuse compared with 49% of parents assigned to the standard community group. Additional enhanced services did not improve the efficacy of PCIT. The relative superiority of PCIT was mediated by greater reduction in negative parent–child interactions, consistent with the PCIT change model. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology en_US
dc.subject Research en_US
dc.subject Randomized Controlled Trial en_US
dc.subject Child en_US
dc.subject Children en_US
dc.subject Childhood en_US
dc.subject Minor en_US
dc.subject Offending Caregivers en_US
dc.subject Child Welfare-Involved en_US
dc.subject Child Protective Services en_US
dc.subject Training en_US
dc.subject Prevention en_US
dc.subject Risk Factors en_US
dc.subject Intervention en_US
dc.subject Childcare en_US
dc.subject Abuse en_US
dc.subject Family Violence en_US
dc.subject Child Abuse en_US
dc.subject Child Neglect en_US
dc.subject Children Exposed to Violence en_US
dc.subject Behavioral Problems en_US
dc.subject Parenting Interventions en_US
dc.subject Parents en_US
dc.subject Serial Victimization en_US
dc.subject Serial Offender en_US
dc.subject Repeat Offender en_US
dc.subject Repeat Victimization en_US
dc.subject Reoffending en_US
dc.title Parent–Child Interaction Therapy With Physically Abusive Parents: Efficacy for Reducing Future Abuse Reports en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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