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dc.contributor.author Lachs, Mark
dc.contributor.author Pillemer, Karl
dc.date.accessioned 2019-07-01T17:20:57Z
dc.date.available 2019-07-01T17:20:57Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.citation Lachs, Mark & Pillemer, Karl. (2015). Elder abuse. New England Journal of Medicine: 373(20), 1947-1956. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMra1404688
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/1372
dc.description.abstract Although it has probably existed since antiquity, elder abuse was first described in the medical literature in the 1970s.1 Many initial attempts to define the clinical spectrum of the phenomenon and to formulate effective intervention strategies were limited by their anecdotal nature or were epidemiologically flawed. The past decade, however, has seen improvements in the quality of research on elder abuse that should be of interest to clinicians who care for older adults and their families. Financial exploitation of older adults, which was explored only minimally in the initial studies, has recently been identified as a virtual epidemic and as a problem that may be detected or suspected by an alert physician. In the field of long-term care, studies have uncovered high rates of interpersonal violence and aggression toward older adults; in particular, abuse of older residents by other residents in long-term care facilities is now recognized as a problem that is more common than physical abuse by staff.2,3 The use of interdisciplinary or interprofessional teams, also referred to as multidisciplinary teams in the context of elder abuse, has emerged as one of the intervention strategies to address the complex and multidimensional needs and problems of victims of elder abuse, and such teams are an important resource for physicians.4,5 These new developments suggest an expanded role for physicians in assessing and treating victims of elder abuse and in referring them for further care. In this review, we summarize research and clinical evidence on the extent, assessment, and management of elder abuse, derived from our analysis of high-quality studies and recent systematic studies and reviews of the literature on elder abuse. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher New England Journal of Medicine en_US
dc.subject Research Review en_US
dc.subject Elder Mistreatment en_US
dc.subject Elder Abuse en_US
dc.subject Elder Neglect en_US
dc.subject Older Adults en_US
dc.subject Older Persons en_US
dc.subject Seniors en_US
dc.subject Abuse in Later Life en_US
dc.subject Financial Exploitation en_US
dc.subject Financial Abuse en_US
dc.subject Prevalence en_US
dc.subject Risk Factors en_US
dc.subject Trauma en_US
dc.subject Physical Consequences en_US
dc.subject Injury en_US
dc.subject Health Consequences en_US
dc.subject Impact en_US
dc.subject Hospitalization en_US
dc.subject Victims en_US
dc.subject Survivors en_US
dc.subject Psychological Consequences en_US
dc.subject Emotional Burden en_US
dc.subject Medical Providers en_US
dc.subject Screening en_US
dc.subject Detection en_US
dc.subject Clinicians en_US
dc.subject Health Professionals en_US
dc.subject Gaps in Research en_US
dc.subject Gaps in Knowledge en_US
dc.subject Multidisciplinary Teams en_US
dc.subject Interprofessional Teams en_US
dc.subject Physicians en_US
dc.title Elder Abuse en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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