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Victim Services Start in the Waiting Room

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dc.contributor.author DePrince, Anne
dc.contributor.author Wright, Naomi
dc.date.accessioned 2019-06-19T19:03:40Z
dc.date.available 2019-06-19T19:03:40Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation DePrince, Anne; Wright, Naomi. (2018). Victim Services Start in the Waiting Room. University of Denver, 5 pgs. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://traumaresearchnotes.blog/2018/12/10/victim-services-start-in-the-waiting-room/
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/1334
dc.description Blog Post en_US
dc.description.abstract We asked more than 200 women who were sexually assaulted in the last year (the majority of whom had been raped) about their victim service experiences, including how to improve responses. The women with whom we spoke were diverse with respect to age, ethnic/racial background, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status. In line with research nationally (Littel, 2001), many women told us that they spent time in public waiting rooms to seek health and police services after the sexual assault…. Across this diverse group of women, one thing was clear: Improving victim services begins in the waiting room…. Women made clear that their experiences in hospital or police station waiting rooms set the tone for their interaction with that agency. While the kinds of changes that systems need to make to be responsive to sexual assault survivors are sometimes fundamental or expensive, here we have practical, actionable advice from women on how to better engage them in the aftermath of sexual assault. In particular, their observations point to revisiting waiting procedures to ensure: welcoming, organized, and victim-centered waiting spaces without exposure to offenders; privacy when possible; fast connection to victim advocates or sexual assault specialists who can help them navigate through the appointment. Modest changes to waiting procedures promise to improve victim services, facilitating women’s access to justice and healing. [CVRL Note: Summary of research from the Traumatic Stress Studies (TSS) Group at the University of Denver.] (Author Text) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of Denver en_US
dc.subject Survey Results en_US
dc.subject Research Into Practice en_US
dc.subject Female en_US
dc.subject Women en_US
dc.subject Survivor en_US
dc.subject Victim Services en_US
dc.subject Service Provider en_US
dc.subject Crime Reporting en_US
dc.subject Advocacy en_US
dc.subject Accommodations en_US
dc.subject Healthcare en_US
dc.subject Sexual Assault Evidence Collection en_US
dc.subject Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner en_US
dc.subject Gaps in Service en_US
dc.subject Violence Against Women en_US
dc.subject Assault en_US
dc.subject Sexual Assault en_US
dc.subject Sexual Violence en_US
dc.subject Sexual Abuse en_US
dc.subject Victim Input en_US
dc.subject Victim Voice en_US
dc.subject Barriers to Service en_US
dc.subject Interview Room en_US
dc.subject Trauma-informed en_US
dc.subject Victim-centered en_US
dc.subject Environment en_US
dc.subject Decor en_US
dc.subject Soft Interview Rooms en_US
dc.subject Law Enforcement en_US
dc.subject Police en_US
dc.subject Comfort Rooms en_US
dc.subject Privacy en_US
dc.subject Family Rooms en_US
dc.title Victim Services Start in the Waiting Room en_US
dc.type Other en_US


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