center for victim research repository

The 2016 Minnesota Crime Victimization Survey: Final Report

Show simple item record

dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-07T19:43:37Z
dc.date.available 2019-05-07T19:43:37Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation (2017). The 2016 Minnesota Crime Victimization Survey: Final Report. Statistical Analysis Center in Minnesota Department of Public Safety Office of Justice Programs, 67 pgs. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://dps.mn.gov/divisions/ojp/statistical-analysis-center/Documents/The%202016%20Minnesota%20Crime%20Victimization%20Survey%20-%20Final.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/1281
dc.description Report en_US
dc.description.abstract The Minnesota Statistical Analysis Center, a part of the Office of Justice Programs (OJP), administered a statewide survey of victimization in late 2016 for the first time since 2010. The mixed-mode survey collected data on experiences with crime victimization within the previous year, perceptions of safety and police effectiveness, and basic demographic information from 1,560 adults via mailed and web-based surveys. To ensure a representative sample with an adequate proportion of racial and ethnic minority respondents, households from majority non-white neighborhoods were over-sampled. The resulting sample, coupled with sample weights, provides a portrait similar to that of Minnesota residents as a whole....About 37 percent of all respondents to this survey reported victimization of any form included in the survey. Compared to the most recent Minnesota Crime Victimization Survey, self-reported victimization has remained stable or risen slightly for certain types of crime. Over this same period of time, most types of serious crimes have continued to decline since the 1990s, according to official crime data. Of the respondents that reported victimization(s) in this survey, approximately 38 percent were victimized more than once, and a little less than 30 percent reported the most recent victimization event to the police. Only age, income, and geographic location were significantly associated with experiencing any form of victimization covered in this survey. The youngest respondents (ages 18 to 24), the highest-income respondents ($100,000 per year or more), and Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area residents all had the highest rates of victimization. (Author Text) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Minnesota Department of Public Safety Office of Justice Programs en_US
dc.subject Survey Results en_US
dc.subject Victimization en_US
dc.subject Repeat Victimization en_US
dc.subject Revictimization en_US
dc.subject Victimization Rates en_US
dc.subject Property Crime en_US
dc.subject Fraud en_US
dc.subject Interpersonal Violence en_US
dc.subject Violent Crime en_US
dc.subject Crime Reporting en_US
dc.subject Help Seeking en_US
dc.subject Firearm Licenses en_US
dc.subject Demographics en_US
dc.subject Monetary Loss en_US
dc.subject Financial Crime en_US
dc.subject Economic Crimes en_US
dc.subject Identity Theft en_US
dc.subject Stalking en_US
dc.subject Intimate Partner Violence en_US
dc.subject Sexual Violence en_US
dc.subject Robbery en_US
dc.subject Violent Victimization en_US
dc.title The 2016 Minnesota Crime Victimization Survey: Final Report en_US
dc.type Other en_US


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search


Browse

My Account