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Media Participation and Mental Health in Terrorist Attack Survivors

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dc.contributor.author Thoresen, Siri
dc.contributor.author Jensen, Tine
dc.contributor.author Dyb, Grete
dc.date.accessioned 2019-03-25T20:47:43Z
dc.date.available 2019-03-25T20:47:43Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.citation Thoresen, Siri; Jensen, Tine; Dyb, Grete. (2014). Media Participation and Mental Health in Terrorist Attack Survivors. Journal of Traumatic Stress: 27, 639-646. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/jts.21971
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/1212
dc.description.abstract Terrorism and disasters receive massive media attention, and victims are often approached by reporters. Not much is known about how terror and disaster victims perceive the contact with media and whether such experiences influence mental health. In this study, we describe how positive and negative experiences with media relate to posttraumatic stress (PTS) reactions among survivors of the 2011 Utøya Island terrorist attack in Norway. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 285 survivors (47.0% female and 53.0% male) 14–15 months after the terrorist attack. Most survivors were approached by reporters (94%), and participated in media interviews (88%). The majority of survivors evaluated their media contact and participation as positive, and media participation was unrelated to PTS reactions. Survivors who found media participation distressing had more PTS reactions (quite distressing: B = 0.440, extremely distressing: B = 0.611, p = .004 in adjusted model). Perceiving media participation as distressing was slightly associated with lower levels of social support (r = –.16, p = .013), and regretting media participation was slightly associated with feeling let down (r = .18, p = .004). Reporters should take care when interviewing victims, and clinicians should be aware of media exposure as a potential additional strain on victims. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies en_US
dc.subject Post Traumatic Stress Disorder en_US
dc.subject Interview Results en_US
dc.subject Terrorism en_US
dc.subject Mass Violence en_US
dc.subject Collective Victimization en_US
dc.subject PTSD en_US
dc.subject Posttraumatic Stress en_US
dc.subject Bombing en_US
dc.subject Shooting en_US
dc.subject Firearm Violence en_US
dc.subject Gun Violence en_US
dc.subject Emotional Burden en_US
dc.subject Teens en_US
dc.subject Adolescents en_US
dc.subject Children en_US
dc.subject Young Adults en_US
dc.subject Emerging Adults en_US
dc.subject Emotional Distress en_US
dc.subject Media Attention en_US
dc.subject Media Coverage en_US
dc.subject Media Participation en_US
dc.subject Psychological Consequences en_US
dc.subject Anxiety en_US
dc.subject News Coverage en_US
dc.subject Interviews with the Media en_US
dc.subject Revictimization en_US
dc.subject Triggering en_US
dc.subject Disclosure en_US
dc.subject Secondary Victimization en_US
dc.subject International en_US
dc.subject Norway en_US
dc.title Media Participation and Mental Health in Terrorist Attack Survivors en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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