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Protecting Your Name: A Survey of Montanans on Identity Theft

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dc.contributor.author Dinger, Erica
dc.contributor.author Sauer, Jennifer
dc.date.accessioned 2019-01-30T21:58:13Z
dc.date.available 2019-01-30T21:58:13Z
dc.date.issued 2006
dc.identifier.citation Dinger, Erica; Sauer, Jennifer. (2006). Protecting Your Name: A Survey of Montanans on Identity Theft. AARP, 24 pgs. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/consume/mt_id.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/1136
dc.description Report en_US
dc.description.abstract Identity theft is a growing problem across the country. Since 1998, 27.3 million people have been affected by identity theft, and it has cost victims a reported $5 billion in out-of-pocket expenses. In 2004, the State of Montana reported 39.3 victims of identity theft per 100,000 in the population. Credit card fraud accounted for 30 percent of the identity theft in Montana. To help combat identity theft, the Montana Attorney General has committed to introducing legislation in the 2007 Legislature for a security freeze for Montanans. Given this alarming trend, this survey of 800 registered voters in Montana explores: Concern about becoming the victim of identity theft; Support for security freeze legislation and consumer protections for identity theft. This telephone survey was conducted between January 19 and January 25, 2006 with a random sample of 800 registered voters in Montana. A complete methodology and annotated survey are located at the end of this report. Over half (51%) of registered voters in Montana are concerned about becoming the victim of identity theft through someone getting access to their bank accounts, checking accounts, or credit cards. About the same (50%) number of Montana voters are concerned about being the victim of identity theft by someone gaining access to their personal information and using it to open new accounts. Almost eight in ten (78%) voters support security freeze legislation in Montana. This support drops significantly if credit bureaus are permitted to charge fees for setting up and lifting a security freeze. Seven in ten (71%) voters say it is important for Montana to strengthen laws and regulations that protect consumers from identity theft. Nearly three in ten (29%) voters say they would be more likely to vote for a candidate for political office if he or she supported enacting security freeze legislation. (Author Text) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher AARP en_US
dc.subject Survey Results en_US
dc.subject Identity Theft en_US
dc.subject Fraud en_US
dc.subject Financial Crime en_US
dc.subject Consumer Crimes en_US
dc.subject Public Opinion en_US
dc.subject Community Perceptions en_US
dc.subject Community Attitudes en_US
dc.subject Legislation en_US
dc.title Protecting Your Name: A Survey of Montanans on Identity Theft en_US
dc.type Other en_US


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