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Intimate partner violence and mental health symptoms in African American female ED patients

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dc.contributor.author Houry, Debra
dc.contributor.author Kemball, Robin
dc.contributor.author Rhodes, Karin
dc.contributor.author Kaslow, Nadine
dc.date.accessioned 2017-11-07T08:35:00Z
dc.date.available 2017-11-07T08:35:00Z
dc.date.issued 2006
dc.identifier.citation Houry, Debra; Kemball, Robin; Rhodes, Karin V.; & Kaslow, Nadine J. (2006). Intimate partner violence and mental health symptoms in African American female ED patients. The American Journal of Emergency Medicine, 24(4), 444–450. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1617212/pdf/nihms12910.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/112
dc.description.abstract Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV) victims often seek care in the ED, whether for an injury from abuse or other sequelae such as mental health symptoms. Objectives: The objective of the study was to assess whether depressive symptoms, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and suicidality were associated with physical, sexual, or emotional IPV in African American female ED patients and to determine if experiencing multiple types of abuse was associated with increased mental health symptoms. Methods: All eligible African American female patients were approached in the ED waiting room during study periods. Patients participated in the screening process via a computer kiosk. Questions regarding IPV and mental health symptoms were asked using validated tools. Results: In this prospective cohort, 569 participated and 36% of those in a relationship in the past year (n = 461) disclosed that there were victims of IPV in the past year. In the past year, 22% experienced recent physical abuse, 9% recent sexual abuse, and 32% recent emotional abuse. A Pearson correlation was conducted and showed that all mental health symptoms were positively correlated with each type of IPV and each type of mental health symptom category. Mental health symptoms increased significantly with amount of abuse: depression (odds ratio [OR], 5.9 for 3 types of abuse), PTSD (OR, 9.4 for 3), and suicidality (OR, 17.5 for 3). Conclusions: Emotional, sexual, and physical IPV were significantly associated with mental health symptoms. Each type of abuse was independently associated with depression, suicidality, and PTSD. Experiencing more than 1 type of abuse was also correlated with increased mental health symptoms. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Violence Against Women en_US
dc.subject Spouse Abuse en_US
dc.subject Psychological Effects en_US
dc.subject Race en_US
dc.subject Research en_US
dc.subject Victim Services en_US
dc.subject Black
dc.subject Domestic Violence
dc.title Intimate partner violence and mental health symptoms in African American female ED patients en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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