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Evaluation of Green Dot: An Active Bystander Intervention to Reduce Sexual Violence on College Campuses

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dc.contributor.author Coker, Ann
dc.contributor.author Cook-Craig, Patricia
dc.contributor.author Williams, Corrine
dc.contributor.author Fisher, Bonnie
dc.contributor.author Garcia, Lisandra
dc.contributor.author Hegge, Lea
dc.date.accessioned 2018-12-12T22:26:44Z
dc.date.available 2018-12-12T22:26:44Z
dc.date.issued 2011
dc.identifier.citation Coker, Ann; Cook-Craig, Patricia; Williams, Corrine; Fisher, Bonnie; Clear, Emily; Garcia, Lisandra; Hegge, Lea. (2011). Evaluation of Green Dot: An Active Bystander Intervention to Reduce Sexual Violence on College Campuses. Violence Against Women, 20 pgs. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.kasap.org/images/files/News/evaluation_of_green_dot.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/1008
dc.description.abstract Using a cross-sectional survey of a random sample of 7,945 college undergraduates, we report on the association between having received Green Dot active bystander behavior training and the frequency of actual and observed self-reported active bystander behaviors as well as violence acceptance norms. Of 2,504 students aged 18 to 26 who completed the survey, 46% had heard a Green Dot speech on campus, and 14% had received active bystander training during the past 2 years. Trained students had significantly lower rape myth acceptance scores than did students with no training. Trained students also reported engaging in significantly more bystander behaviors and observing more self-reported active bystander behaviors when compared with nontrained students. When comparing self reported active bystander behavior scores of students trained with students hearing a Green Dot speech alone, the training was associated with significantly higher active bystander behavior scores. Those receiving bystander training appeared to report more active bystander behaviors than those simply hearing a Green Dot speech, and both intervention groups reported more observed and active bystander behaviors than nonexposed students. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Kentucky Association of Sexual Assault Programs en_US
dc.subject Survey Results en_US
dc.subject Bystander Intervention en_US
dc.subject Students en_US
dc.subject College en_US
dc.subject University en_US
dc.subject Campus Safety en_US
dc.subject Campus Crime en_US
dc.subject Sexual Assault en_US
dc.subject Rape en_US
dc.subject Victim Blaming en_US
dc.subject Blame en_US
dc.subject Community Perceptions en_US
dc.subject Education en_US
dc.subject School Safety en_US
dc.subject Community-based en_US
dc.subject Peer Relations en_US
dc.subject Peer Support en_US
dc.subject Community Leader en_US
dc.subject Prevention en_US
dc.title Evaluation of Green Dot: An Active Bystander Intervention to Reduce Sexual Violence on College Campuses en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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