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dc.contributor.author Kahn, Ellen
dc.contributor.author Johnson, Ashland
dc.contributor.author Lee, Mark
dc.contributor.author Miranda, Liam
dc.date.accessioned 2018-12-12T21:55:27Z
dc.date.available 2018-12-12T21:55:27Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Kahn, Ellen; Johnson, Ashland; Lee, Mark; Miranda, Liam. (2018). LGBTQ Youth Report 2018. Human Rights Campaign and University of Connecticut, 33 pgs. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://assets2.hrc.org/files/assets/resources/2018-YouthReport-0514-Final.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11990/1007
dc.description Report en_US
dc.description.abstract The results of HRC’s 2017 Youth Survey reveal persistent, serious challenges for LGBTQ youth. In many cases, the cards remain stacked against LGBTQ-identified youth in terms of acceptance and support from their families, their mental health and safety in schools. For LGBTQ youth of color these challenges are compounded by racism and race-related stressors. Transgender and gender-expansive youth also face unique challenges. In school, a lack of inclusive policies and procedures creates obstacles to their safety and well-being. Equally compelling, however, are the stories of empowerment, resilience, activism and advocacy from the survey respondents. Across the country, LGBTQ youth are taking a stand and advocating for inclusivity and equality in their homes, schools and communities. Parents, school administrators, teachers, counselors and other youth-serving professionals can stand with LGBTQ youth by following their lead and implementing the actionable guidelines in this report to create safe, affirming and welcoming spaces for LGBTQ youthIn 2017, the Human Rights Campaign Foundation partnered with researchers at the University of Connecticut to deploy a comprehensive survey capturing the experiences of LGBTQ youth in their family settings, schools, social circles and communities. Over 12,000 youth aged 13-17 participated in the survey, with representation from all 50 states and the District of Columbia. More information about the survey process, materials and respondent profiles can be found in the methodology on page 22. [CVRL Note: see page 7 about sexual violence and page 9-12 about anti-bullying laws and harassment.] (Author Text) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Human Rights Campaign (HRC) en_US
dc.subject Survey Results en_US
dc.subject LGBTQ en_US
dc.subject LGBT en_US
dc.subject Lesbian en_US
dc.subject Gay en_US
dc.subject Transgender en_US
dc.subject Trans en_US
dc.subject Queer en_US
dc.subject Genderqueer en_US
dc.subject Transphobic en_US
dc.subject Homophobic en_US
dc.subject Sexual Orientation en_US
dc.subject Gender Identity en_US
dc.subject Gender-based Violence en_US
dc.subject Sexual Harassment en_US
dc.subject Harassment en_US
dc.subject School Safety en_US
dc.subject School Violence en_US
dc.subject Students en_US
dc.subject Sexual Violence en_US
dc.subject Sexual Assault en_US
dc.subject Peer-on-peer Abuse en_US
dc.subject Bullying en_US
dc.subject Verbal Abuse en_US
dc.subject Threatening Behavior en_US
dc.subject Physical Assault en_US
dc.subject Intersectional en_US
dc.subject Race en_US
dc.subject Discrimination en_US
dc.subject Rape en_US
dc.subject Emotional Burden en_US
dc.subject Emotional Distress en_US
dc.subject Depression en_US
dc.subject Anxiety en_US
dc.subject Social Support en_US
dc.subject Mental Health en_US
dc.subject People of Color en_US
dc.subject Climate Survey en_US
dc.title LGBTQ Youth Report 2018 en_US
dc.type Other en_US


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